Why You Should Consider Writing A Trilogy #SundayBlogShare #Writers @tonyriches

Why Your Should Consider Writing A

When medieval historical fiction author Tony Riches contacted me to say that he had a fab guest blog post up his sleeve I was over the moon.

When I read his guest blog post I felt like one of my big writing related questions had been answered. The question being – why should you consider writing a trilogy?

Prior to Tony’s guest post, I spent a lot of time thinking about why you should consider writing a trilogy. I came up with the following points:

  • You should write a trilogy if you secretly crave literary pain. Writing one book won’t come close to satisfying your literary pain needs, so you need to write three in quick succession to get your fix. 
  • You should write a trilogy if you can’t think of a way to end your story and you strongly believe that come the end of writing the third book you will have figured it out. 
  • You should write a trilogy if you have fallen madly in love with one of your characters and can’t bear to be parted from them. Writing a story about your crush and spanning it over three books might help you get this fictional love interest out of your system. Your readers might not share your love for this character but that’s low level detail. 
  • You should write a trilogy if you have an attention seeking diva of a main character who demands a bigger world stage. Give them a trilogy and watch their power hungry eyes light up! 

To my surprise Tony has come up with a different set of reasons to me. 

Check out this great post below. 

Take it away Tony!

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28 Things You Don’t Need To Worry About When You Write A First Draft #MondayBlogs #Writers

 

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Once you have written a few first drafts you realise there are some things you don’t need to waste valuable time and energy worrying about. The first stage is simply an outpouring of words onto a page. Nothing else.

Here is a list of 28 things you don’t need to worry about whilst writing your first draft.
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10 Writer Learnings From The London Book Fair 2017 #WritersLife #LBF17 #Writer

Things I took away from

This week I attended the London Book Fair 2017 and wanted to do a post to share my writer learnings from the event.

Apologies to those expecting the next part of my series Heaven Calling. It will be back next week.

I have never attended the London Book Fair before so I didn’t really know what to expect.

Here are my learnings.

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Do You Have Author Potential? Take The Author Test Today! #ASMSG #SundayBlogShare @SteveBoseley

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When horror and dark fiction author Steve Boseley contacted me to say that he shared my blonde humour, wanted to have some literary fun and had a cracking guest blog post up his sleeve, I had to have a sugary cup of tea and a lie down. It’s not everyday a young (ish), blonde, fluffy, cute (using certain filters and a good photo editing app), chicklit writer, like myself, gets an offer like this… especially not from a dashing horror author like Steve. *Sigh*

Steve’s guest post made me chuckle – so here it is.

Do You Have Author Potential?  Take The Author Test!

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Why Forgiveness Is So Important For Writers #MondayBlogs #Writers #AmWriting

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This past week I have learnt the importance of forgiveness in my creative life. It came to me after I read Spirit Junkie – A Radical Road To Discovering Self Love And Miracles by Gabrielle Bernstein. The book is excellent and really resonated with me. It is one of those wonderful self-help books where you read it and cringe a lot, as you can see yourself on the page.

There is an entire section of the book dedicated to forgiveness. I never thought about the importance of forgiveness until I read this book.

If I could rename myself I would be called Little Miss Bitterness.

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Author Interviews -Allie Potts @alliepottswrite #AmWriting #Writer

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Welcome to my weekly blog series – Author Interviews.

Every Saturday I get to interview inspiring authors who let me into their creative world. I get to hear how they overcame tough literary challenges, the highlights from their book writing journey and their answer to the big literary question –  what do they wear whilst working on their literary masterpieces?

This week I am joined by author and blogger Allie Potts. She describes herself as a ‘writer, geek and a constant self improver.’  I read her book ‘An Uncertain Faith’ last year and struggled to put it down, so she has been on my author hit list for sometime.

I do love Allie’s Twitter profile which reads ‘my Twitter activity may sometimes seem all over the place, but that is just how my mind works.’  This reminds me of how I approach Twitter.

Please welcome Allie Potts!

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How To Remain Patient With Your Favourite Author #SundayBlogShare #Books #Author

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It is not easy waiting for your favourite author to bring out their next book.

After binge reading all their books, fangirling them by email and social media, all you can do is sit and wait for their next offering.

This agonising waiting period will involve some serious finger drumming, a lot of social media stalking and you forcing yourself to enjoy other books (written by other authors – gasp!).

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Author Interviews Andrew Joyce @huckfinn76 #HistoricalFiction #Author

Author Interviews-2

Welcome to my weekly blog series – Author Interviews.

I love interviewing inspirational and interesting authors. They make my Saturday!  In these interviews I get to glean some insight into their writing life and understand what obstacles they encountered whilst writing their books.

BlondeWriteMore readers we are in for such a treat as author and blogger Andew Joyce has agreed to come sit in my red chair!  He lives on a boat, has a dog called Danny, has six books under his belt and I have heard he once threw his TV out of the window, before writing his first short story. As you can imagine I am bubbling with excitement about this interview. I do hope he talks about the TV incident and I hope his short story was worth it!

Hey Andrew!  Welcome to my blog and red chair. Tell my readers about yourself and the book/books you have written.

I live on a boat in Fort Lauderdale, Florida with my dog, Danny. I write books. And when I’m not writing, I’m working with my editor. And when I’m not working with my editor, I’m marketing my latest book. Then I start the process all over again. I pace myself to one book a year. That way I don’t have to work so hard. Four months for writing, three for editing, and five for marketing (which I detest).

When did you write your first book?

One morning, about six years ago, I went crazy. I got out of bed, went downstairs, and threw my TV out the window. Then I sat down at the computer and wrote my first short story. Just for the hell of it, I threw it up on a writing site. A few months later, I was informed that it had been selected for publication in an anthology of the best short stories of 2011. I even got paid for it. That’s when I started writing Yellow Hair.

Oh my goodness Andrew – I am loving this crazy TV chucking stage you went through before writing a short story!  In my experience I tend to chuck things after I have written and have gone back to edit. 

Wow – your story got selected for publication! I need to go through this crazy stage of yours. I just hope my family are supportive when I lob our TV set out of the window. 

What was your motivation to write your first book?

It all started way back in 2011. My first book was a 164,000-word historical novel (Yellow Hair). And in the publishing world, anything over 80,000 words for a first-time author is heresy. Or so I was told time and time again when I approached an agent for representation. After two years of research and writing, and a year of trying to secure the services of an agent, I got angry. To be told that my efforts were meaningless was somewhat demoralizing to say the least. I mean, those rejections were coming from people who had never even read my book.

“So you want an 80,000-word novel?” I said to no one in particular, unless you count my dog, because he was the only one around at the time. Consequently, I decided to show them City Slickers that I could write an 80,000-word novel!

I had just finished reading Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn for the third time, and I started thinking about what ever happened to those boys, Tom and Huck. They must have grown up, but then what? So I sat down at my computer, banged out REDEMPTION: The Further Adventures of Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer in two months, then sent out query letters to agents.

Less than a month later, the chairman of one of the biggest agencies in New York City emailed me that he loved the story. We signed a contract and it was off to the races, or so I thought. But then the real fun began: the serious editing. Seven months later, I gave birth to Huck and Tom as adults in the Old West. And just for the record, the final word count is 79,914.

The book went on to reach #1 status in its category on Amazon—twice. And it won the Editors’ Choice Award for best Western of 2013. The rest, as they say, is history.
But not quite.

My agent then wanted me to write a sequel, but I had other plans. I was in the middle of editing down Yellow Hair (that had been rejected by 1,876,324 agents . . . or so it seemed) from 164,000 words to the present 139,000. However, he was insistent about a sequel, so I started to think about it. Now, one thing you have to understand is that I tied up all the loose ends at the end of REDEMPTION, so there was no way that I could write a sequel. And that is when Molly asked me to tell her story. Molly was a minor character that we met briefly in the first chapter of REDEMPTION, and then she is not heard from again.
So I started to think about what ever happened to her. After a bit of time—and 100,000 words—we find out what did happen to Molly. It is an adventure tale where Huck Finn weaves through the periphery of a story driven by a strong female lead. Molly Lee was my second book, which achieved #2 status on Amazon.

Now I was finished with Huck Finn for good. Now I could go back to Yellow Hair and resume the editing process.

But not quite.

It was then that Huck and Molly ganged up on me and demanded that I resolve their lives once and for all. It seems that I had left them hanging—so to speak. Hence, RESOLUTION: Huck Finn’s Greatest Adventure.

Then I went back to editing, Yellow Hair.

I am speechless. Wow – what a literary experience!  

What writing issues did you encounter along the way and how did you overcome them?

I encountered no issues while writing my first three published books. My muse was working overtime.

Did you go through any bad writing patches while writing your book – what kept you going?

While writing Yellow Hair, I had to stop to learn the Lakota language. I wanted to immerse myself in the Sioux culture and I wanted to give them dignity by using their language whenever possible. I also wanted to introduce them by their Sioux names. So, I had to learn the Lakota language. And that wasn’t easy. There is a consortium that will teach you, but they wanted only serious students. You have to know a smattering of the language before they will even deign to accept you. I had to take a test to prove that I knew some Lakota. I failed the first time and had to go back to my Lakota dictionary and do some more studying. I got in on my second try.

As to what kept me going, I could opt for the funny answer and say “vodka.” Or I could go with a pretentious answer and say, “The thirst for knowledge.” In reality, it was just so much damn fun.

Are you a plotter or do you just write/see what happens?

When I have an idea for a novel, I know the first sentence and the last paragraph (more or less). Then I sit down and start to tell the story. But the finished product is always different from what I set out to write. Sometimes I will take my characters to a place and they will rebel and take off on their own. Then I have no choice but to follow where they lead.

What is the best thing about being a writer?

The writing.

What is the worst thing about being a writer?

The marketing.

Have you ever considered quitting writing, and if so how have you worked through this?

If I stopped writing, I’d probably buy a TV and watch soap operas all day long. The thought of that alone keeps me at the computer.

What does a typical writing day look like for you?

I prefer to write in the early morning hours when things are quiet. I usually get up around 2:00 a.m. and go to work. The commute is not long . . . only a few steps to my computer.

Do you suffer from procrastination and if so how do you handle it?

Vodka.

Great answer Andrew! I am loving this interview. 

Which is more important, plot or characters and why?

I just tell stories. I don’t think about things like that.

What have been your biggest learning experiences during your writing career?

  • There is no escaping the marketing process.
  • Unless you have the sales of Stephen King, it’s better to be an Indie than have a big-time agent and a publishing house behind you.
  • How many books that I have to compete with on Amazon (8,000,000)!

How do you manage social media as a writer?

I don’t.

Do you have any tips or advice for budding aspiring authors?

  • Read, read . . . and then read some more. Read everything you can get your hands on! Reading to a writer is as medical school is to a doctor, as physical training is to an athlete, as breathing is to life. When one reads stuff like the passage below, one cannot help but become a better writer.
    “The afternoon came down as imperceptibly as age comes to a happy man. A little gold entered into the sunlight. The bay became bluer and dimpled with shore-wind ripples. Those lonely fishermen who believe that the fish bite at high tide left their rocks and their places were taken by others, who were convinced that the fish bite at low tide.”—John Steinbeck, Tortilla Flat
  • Never, ever, ever, ever respond to a negative review!!!

Do you suffer from writer’s block and if so how do you overcome?

My problem, if you can call it a problem, is that I have too many words in my head. Apart from my novels, I have 150 short stories almost ready for publication and another thirty that I’ve started but don’t have the time to finish—at least not at the present time.

Do you ever think of the next book whilst writing?

Only as a fleeting thought.

What do you wear to write?

I’m not tellin’.

If readers want to get in touch how do they contact you?

http://www.andrewjoyce76.com

Andrew, that has to be one of the most entertaining Author Interviews – thank you! 

I am taking several things from this interview:

  • I loved how Huck and Molly ganged up on you and demanded you resolve their lives. 
  • I love how the thought of buying another TV and watching soap operas all day keeps you at your writing desk. 
  • You are the first writer to be interviewed who chooses to get up at 2am to write. Fab!  I am at my best in the small hours too so I might try this…
  • Your writing tips are great and that passage is awesome. 

Thank you for a fab interview. 

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If you are an author and fancy sitting in my red chair please leave me a message in the comments box. 

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Author Interviews Ian Probert @truth42 #Writers #Author #Boxing

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Welcome to my weekly blog series – Author Interviews.

I spend a lot of my time pestering amazing authors and getting them to agree to an interview on my blog.

These interviews provide my readers with valuable insight into a writers’ life. I get to understand how they overcame tough challenges whilst writing their books, what learnings they have for aspiring authors and most importantly what they wear whilst writing their literary masterpieces.

This week I have managed to persuade author Ian Probert to sit in my chair.

Ian is a ‘fighter not a writer’ and on his website describes himself as ‘incredibly handsome. Indescribably intelligent. The most brilliant writer since… Since… Since… Well… William Dickens or Charles Shakespeare’.  He used to play guitar in the Beatles. he’s an opera singer. Beyoncé is his stalker (she’s so irritating!). He played football for Real Madrid. He has an Olympic gold medal for water polo. Andy Murray used to be his ball boy. He played clarinet with Lorraine Bowen and is the secret love child of Marlon Brando and Tessie O’Shea!’

I love his imagination! Almost as good as mine 🙂

Ian knows a bit about boxing, so I am putting on my virtual boxing gloves to do this interview.

Ian – welcome! Please take a seat in my red chair..

Tell my readers about yourself and the book / books you have written

Over the year I’ve had eight or nine books published. These range from children fiction, to teenage fiction, to adult fiction and autobiography. I’ve even had couple of book on photography; kid of a hobby of mine.

When did you write your first book?

My very first book would have been when I was about 12, although you’d have to call it a novella. What I used to do was hand in stories that were several exercise books in length to my bemused English teacher. The poor woman would then have to read them – she must have dreaded giving me homework.

How long did it take to write your first book?

My first published book was called ‘Internet Spy’. That was in 1995. It took about a month. It wasn’t very long.

What was your motivation to write your first book?

What basically happened was that I pitched a teenage fiction series to Kingfisher and they went for it.

I was then commissioned along with people like Terry Deary to write the books.

What writing issues did you encounter along the way and how did you overcome them?

Well apart from the obvious one of typos, which I still don’t understand the psychology behind our ability to totally miss them, it’s always about making things interesting enough for readers to want to carry on reading. Obviously it is. I used to try to get a handle on this by drinking alcohol at the end of the day and then reading what I’d written. I was hoping that I could see things from a different point of view. I don’t think this approach was particularly successful. Although I did used to get very drunk.

Did you go through any bad writing patches during writing your book – what kept you going?

I went through a 15-year long bad writing patch, in which my brain was in a complete fog due to undiagnosed hypothyroid disease. This is one of the many symptoms of the disease – the inability to concentrate. And nothing kept me going – I eventually stopped completely until three years ago, when my condition finally diagnosed.

Are you a plotter or do you just write / see what happens?

I like to have a basic framework or premise and then see where it takes me. If I can surprise myself then hopefully I can surprise others. In the kids book I did a couple of years ago – Johnny Nothing – I actually had no idea how it would end until suddenly the book was finished.

What is the best thing about being a writer?

To be in control of the entire universe.

What is the worst thing about being a writer?

To have no say whatsoever in the universe you inhabit.

Also, no sick pay or paid holidays.

Have you ever considered quitting writing, and if so how have you worked through this?

Apart from my 15-year enforced hiatus, not really. I’m at the age where there’s nothing else I could do. I don’t see anyone suddenly offering me a job. Unless it’s an unpaid one at the local Oxfam.

What does a typical writing day look like for you?

Start around 8:30 when everyone has left the house. Write until about 1:00 or 2:00. Then try to do marketing, household chores, etc.

Do you suffer from procrastination and if so how do you handle it?

Erm… Well… I… Um… Let’s see… No, not at all.

Which is more important – plot or characters and why?

I don’t see either being any more important than the other. It’s no good having a great story with rubbishy characters. And it’s equally useless having great characters with a crappy story. You gotta go for both at the same time.

What have been your 3 biggest learnings during your writing career?

Wow.

1. To be honest.

2. To read your work aloud to others – that way you’ll soon discover if it’s of any value.

3. To learn to accept criticism.

How do you manage social media as a writer?

It’s a necessary evil these days. Although I’m unconvinced that I’ve ever sold a single extra copy as a result of a tweet or a Facebook post. However, if you want a publisher to take you seriously you must have a pretty noticeable web imprint.

As well as a personal website and the obligatory WordPress blog, I tend to do everything. My motto is ‘Facebook for friends and family; Twitter to swear at and insult people you don’t know…’

Do you have any tips or advice for budding aspiring authors?

Don’t do it. Seriously. Don’t. There are plenty of other ways out there to earn enough money to have a varied and full life.

Writing is like acting and music – only the top 5% make any money, the rest are waiters. And, of course, the fewer people decide to write the less competition there is out there for me!

Do you suffer from writer’s block and if so how do you overcome?

I’d say my entire life is a case of writer’s block. The only time I can manage to squeeze any words out of me is when i have a deadline two days away.

Do you ever think of the next book whilst writing?

Yes, sometimes. In Dangerous some of the writing was done at my daughter’s hospital bedside while she fought for her life.I also blogged about it a lot, which the hospital found out about. They then asked me if I’d write a kids book to raise money for the hospital, which is what I’m working on right now.

What do you wear to write?

I’m always completely naked. This stops unnecessary interruptions and intrusions. Believe me, nobody wants to see me naked.

If readers want to get in touch how do they contact you?

The usual places: Twitter, Facebook, and there’s an email address on my personal website. On Thursday’s you’ll often find me in the Flask in Highgate.

Ian’s new book Dangerous came out on 15 September 2016.

Wow Ian – what an intervew! So many things to think about:

  • I totally agree about typos and our amazing ability to miss them or in my case ignore them! 
  • I love the idea of being in control of the entire universe. 
  • Your learnings are great – especially the one about being honest! 
  • Love your approach to Facebook and Twitter. 
  • So many authors are writing naked nowadays –  feel like I am missing out. Do edit naked as well?

Thanks for a great interview!  

 

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If you are an author and want to appear on my blog please leave me a message below in the comment box and I will get in contact 🙂

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Author Interviews @shuchikalra #Writerslife #Writers #Author

Author Interviews-2

Welcome to my Author Interview Blog Series!

This series allows me to interview some amazing and inspirational authors. In the interviews I glean some writing tips from them, find out how they have overcome their literary challenges and most importantly get some valuable insight into their creative life.

This week I am beyond excited as author Shuchi Singh Kalra is sat in my red interview chair. She is a ChickLit author from India, who loves Twitter and describes herself as a ‘free spirit, certified crazy, social awkward cat lady!’ My kind of author – sigh!

Hey, Shuchi! Welcome to my blog!  Please take a seat in my red chair.

Tell my readers about yourself and the book / books you have written

I currently have two books out in the market – both romantic comedies. The first one is ‘Done With Men’, which sounds like a Man-Haters Guide To The Galaxy but isn’t. It’s just a story of a ditzy girl who runs into a series of unfortunate disasters before she finds Mr.Right.

The second one is ‘I am Big. So What?‘ – India’s first plus sized romance. It is a light read but at the same time, touches upon issues of body shaming and self-love.

I like to create strong, zesty female characters that are flawed and yet very endearing. They are ditzy enough to mess up their lives but have it in them to put things back in place.

When did you write your first book?

I started writing ‘Done With Men’ in Jan 2013.

How long did it take to write your first book?

I finished Done With Men in three months flat and I’m still quite smug about it.

‘I am Big. So what?’ took me over a year to write.

What was your motivation to write your first book?

I always had recurrent author dreams of seeing a book with my name on it in a bookstore but I guess I took too long to actually do it. But hell, it’s never too late for anything.

What writing issues did you encounter along the way and how did you overcome them?

Writing a book is actually the easiest part about being an author. The real battle begins when it is time to publish and market your work. I don’t know how it works in the west, but book publishing in India is a rather slow process and by the time a book comes out into the market, an author is very likely to have lost interest in it.

The market for romance is thriving – there are new authors coming in everyday and readers have too much to choose from. This also translates into stiff competition and the need for aggressive marketing and promotion, which can be quite exhausting for an author. Two books down, I am beginning to enjoy it a bit through.

Did you go through any bad writing patches during writing your book – what kept you going?

Oh yes. I run into roadblocks and dead ends more often than I’d like. It helps sometimes to change track. If the story isn’t turning out to be satisfactory, I just scrap it and begin all over again instead of wasting too much time trying to make it work.

It can be disheartening at times to trash all that you’ve written but I always keep my eyes on the larger goal.

Are you a plotter or do you just write / see what happens?

I usually start off with a rough sketch of the story but I don’t plot very extensively. I begin with an idea and let the story take it’s course.

What is the best thing about being a writer?

With every book you write, you get to live so many lives and be so many people. When I write for a character, I have to “become” them in that moment to explore how their mind would work, how they’d respond to a situation and why they are what they are. I find that bit the most thrilling.

What is the worst thing about being a writer?

That you live and work in an isolated bubble and you are the only person responsible to keep yourself driven. Procrastination is practically an epidemic among writers and some days it can be difficult to rap yourself on the knuckles and get some real work done.

Have you ever considered quitting writing, and if so how have you worked through this?

I have had my periods of slumps and stagnation but quitting? Never! I love expressing myself through the written word but there are phases when motivation takes a nosedive. When that happens, I try my hand at something new (by new I obviously mean another form of writing). For example, if I’ve been stuck with a book chapter, I’ll write some poetry for a change. I have found that indulging in other creative activities like crafts etc. also helps considerably.

What does a typical writing day look like for you?

I run a writing firm so I am mostly juggling multiple projects at a time. Book writing is something I do when I can spare time from assignments, although I’d like to transition into full-time authoring eventually. I do most of my writing when my 5 year old daughter is in school or at night after everyone has gone to bed.

Do you suffer from procrastination and if so how do you handle it?

I think procrastination suffers from me. I can be such a slacker at times and I hate myself for it. And that happens only with book writing because when you are writing for businesses, you can’t afford to wait for inspiration to strike you. I keep pushing myself to write SOMETHING every day, even if it just small passage.

A small way forward is still a way forward and always better than stagnation.

Which is more important – plot or characters and why?

I think both those things are equally important. Intricate character development lends credibility to your story and makes it more realistic. It also helps the reader to relate more to your characters. At the same time, you need to keep the reader riveted with an interesting plotline and adequate twists and turns. I think one can’t do without the other.

What have been your 3 biggest learnings during your writing career?

  • It’s going to be slow. Very slow. There’s no such thing as instant gratification.
  • It’s not enough to be a good writer. You have to learn to market yourself well.
  • Don’t count on books for money, at least until you have a few bestsellers out in the market

How do you manage social media as a writer?

I manage it by being addicted to Twitter, which is the absolute wrong way to go about it. I am not a social animal but I’m definitely a social media animal. I love interacting with readers and interesting people online and I must say it has helped my book sales too.

Social media gives you a platform to express yourself as a person, which may motivate people to check out your other writings. I think it’s a great way to come across new opportunities and market your work.

Do you have any tips or advice for budding aspiring authors?

As pleasurable and satisfying as it can be, writing can be sometimes disheartening because the returns are not immediate and competition is high.

The best thing you can do for yourself is to keep trudging along.

Take it one step at a time and don’t jump the gun.

Do you suffer from writer’s block and if so how do you overcome?

When it comes to my professional assignments, I can’t afford writer’s block because there are deadlines to be met and clients to answer to.

However, when it comes to my books, I give myself more leeway to slack. Reading books from the same genre you are writing is the best way to break out of a block. It helps bring your mind into the same zone and you are much more likely to find a trigger for the words to flow.

Do you ever think of the next book whilst writing?

Yes. I’m usually thinking of too many books at the same time. But I try to work on one or at the most, two at a time just for the sake of my sanity.

What do you wear to write?

I work from home so you’ll usually find me in an old tee and a pair of shorts/PJs with my hair pulled up in a bun.

If readers want to get in touch how do they contact you?

I am fairly (okay, insanely) active on Twitter and I connect with most of my readers there. You could also email me for any queries.

Click for Twitter. 

Click for my website.

Wow – What a fab interview! 

There were so many things that stuck out for me in this interview:

  • I can really relate to ‘becoming’ a character in order to understand them and this can be exciting!
  • I think this is a great quote with regards procrastination – ‘small way forward is still a way forward and always better than stagnation’.
  • I can relate to being a ‘social media animal’ – love this!
  • Your learning about instant gratification is very true. You almost have to prepare yourself for years of small progress. 
  • The growing Indian romantic fiction market sounds interesting.
  • Your strong, zesty characters with flaws and wobbly bits sound like my chicklit character Roxy Collins. Yay – to these fun characters!

Thank you!

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For more great interviews click here!

If you are an author and would like to be interviewed in my blog please get in touch!

photo credit: <a href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/79577679@N00/5448848999″>the chair in the attic</a> via <a href=”http://photopin.com”>photopin</a&gt; <a href=”https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/”>(license)</a&gt;